UX PORTFOLIO

Journifi User Experience


Journifi is a plug-in that seamlessly links online and in-store shopping, thereby allowing brick and mortar stores to reestablish their importance and justify their costs. This is the story of how I made a positive difference to customers’ shopping experience from online to offline.

 

To comply with my confidentiality agreement I have omitted and appropriated confidential information. Some of these designs are a reinterpretation of the original.


 

Preparation

 

Business Requirement Interview
– The preliminary step is to gain a proper understanding of business requirements, business model,
etc.

Competitor Benchmarking
– Evaluating competitor products to determine their strengths and weaknesses and opportunities
to innovate with your own product.
– Some projects may not allow the time to do this activity.
– In sectors you are familiar with, this becomes less important.

 

Amazon

Amazon is the biggest disruptor to both physical stores and digital stores. Their mammoth economies of scale and scope make it extremely difficult to compete without becoming unprofitable.

We spotted an opportunity to help retailers enhance their user experience and provide a more human, individualized service. Through this tailored customer interaction, retailers would be able to compete laterally and subsequently take back a portion of the market.

 

Expert Reviews
– Gathering a quick understanding of a product’s key usability issues.
– Acquiring a deep understanding of real user issues.


 

Research

 

Contextual Research
– Conducting research in the environment that users are naturally within.
– Gaining the most representative insight into how people actually behave in their own
environment and the methods they use to overcome the problems they face.

Analytics
– Evaluating quantitative data to understand what people are doing when using a product or
service.
– Identifying interesting user behavior to focus research activities to find out why.

Surveys
– Collecting information from a dispersed set of people by asking them to respond to a
predetermined set of questions.

– Can present issues with data accuracy.

Ideation Workshops
– A collaborative design method to help us decide on design solutions together.
– Generating a shared vision for the UX design work. Getting early input from different disciplines
such as visual designers and developers.

Surveys
– Collecting information from a dispersed set of people by asking them to respond to a
predetermined set of questions.
– Can present issues with data accuracy.

Ideation Workshops
– A collaborative design method to help us decide on design solutions together.
– Generating a shared vision for the UX design work. Getting early input from different disciplines
such as visual designers and developers.


 

Exploration

 

Task Models
– Descriptions of the activities users perform in order to reach their goals.
– Ensuring your product matches user expectations.
– Providing insight into buying processes and thus helping you design transactional websites that
support user needs.

Personas
– Short, vivid descriptions of fictional characters who represent a product’s users.
– A method to reduce the need for user testing which is time-consuming. To be used on budget
projects.

Customer Experience Maps
– Visualising the entire customer journey and highlighting the specific areas where a product or
service meets and fails to meet user needs.
– Visualisation can be simply done with post it notes for budget projects.

User Journeys
– Identify how users flow through your product. Design the structure of your product to ensure
users can flow through it efficiently.
– To ensure key tasks are easy to accomplish.


 

Information Architecture

 

Brainstorming
– Discover the general journey of information and interaction we think aught to happen.

Site Map
– Important to create cohesiveness and intuitive hierarchy.


 

Design & Prototyping

 

Sketching
– Hand-drawn design ideas.
– Quickly generate and gather feedback on lots of design ideas.
– Decide which ideas to pursue in higher fidelity.

Wireframes
– Static diagrams that represent the framework of a product, exploring content, navigation and
interactions.
– Explore design and interaction ideas before they move into graphic design and development.
– Agree on the direction. Test ideas with users. Refine ideas based on feedback and test results.

Prototypes
– Mocking up ideas quickly in an interactive form that brings them to life to provide more accurate
feedback.
– Producing something so that there is a shared understanding and approval of the direction it is
taking.- Complicated prototypes can be time-consuming to amend.


 Logo Design 

 

Journifi Logo

 


 

Prototyping

We tried a few prototyping apps and quickly settled on Invision due to its ease of use, breadth of functionality, and price point. The primary focus of the prototyping was to tell an engaging, compelling story, as well as highlight the app transitions and provide context.

The development phase was not to begin until after further seed rounds had been completed so there was a great deal riding on being able to create a complete picture with our prototype. Furthermore, the quality of the prototype would dictate the quality of the testing results. This led us to settle on an extremely high-fidelity prototype. The video at the end of this case study shows the prototype in action.

One of the downsides of Invision is that replacing pages would break transitions. This made amendments a little slower than we’d have liked. Aside from this, the final prototype is extremely flexible and well represents the plug-in we wanted to create.

 


 

Testing

I worked with Journifi’s CEO to define tasks, establish objectives, and evaluate the app.

All testing was done using our Invision prototype. This prototype functions exactly as the plug-in aims to, bar keyboard input.

Guerilla Usability Testing
– Very informal user involvement, usually done digitally or with those within the business’ current
network.
– Involving users when budgets prevent larger scale user research.
– Quickly gaining user opinions to help to progress and direct designs.

Lab Usability Testing
– Involving end users in the design process to understand their needs, find out how they do things
and see if they can use the product in a controlled environment.
– The controlled environment allows you to test what you want with the right people.
– An artificial environment may influence user behavior on some projects.
– For project with small budgets.

Remote Usability Testing
– Conducting user research in different locations.
– Useful when you need to test geographic differences. When people can’t travel to a lab. When
time is tight, as you can run tests in parallel.
– Nowhere near as effective as in-person usability testing.

 

The Complete Journey